HS2 route will go through Lowton and Leigh Golf Club course at Culcheth

HS2 rail heads through Lowton

HS2 rail heads through Lowton

First published in News

THE route earmarked for the £34 billion HS2 high-speed railway line from London to Manchester would bulldoze its way through Lowton and over Leigh Golf Club course.

This week the Government announced its preferred route for the new railway line – where trains can reach 225mph – and left Lowton stunned.

Leigh MP Andy Burnham, below, described the news as ‘a total bombshell for Lowton’.

Yet Makerfield MP Yvonne Fovargue welcomed the news.

She said: “Faster journey times, job creation, economic benefits to Greater Manchester plus extra capacity on the rail network are a real boost for the north west and I welcome the announcement.”

Mr Burnham said: “For Wigan it is a very big thing but the disruption is at this end. Lowton is being carved up yet again getting all of the hassle and none of the benefits.

“At first sign the plan is unacceptable. As far as I can see the line goes over the golf course at Culcheth then over the Liverpool-Manchester railway at Kenyon.”

The route then follows the former Glazebrook-Wigan line under the East Lancashire Road and tunnels take it under Newton Road at the top of Pocket Nook Lane where the Lowton St Mary’s station used to be. The track re-emerges near Lowton Civic Hall, skirts Dover Lock at Abram and joins the West Coast Mainline at Bamfurlong then on to Wigan.

Mr Burnham added: “The first implication is that it leaves Wigan’s Core Strategy for development in tatters. As it stands it is fundamentally flawed.”

Leigh Golf Club members are understandably concerned about the HS2 route.

Speaking from the club’s base at Broseley Lane, Culcheth, club secretary Tony O’Neill said: “We are very concerned. The first impression is that it certainly affects two or three holes. The club council will be meeting to discuss the situation.”

Lowton East Clr James Cowley said: “I want to assure residents that I am going to be working with Andy Burnham on these proposals. I personally thought they would branch it on to the West Coast line further south.”

Clr Pam Gilligan added: “I will work with my colleagues locally and with Andy Burnham to mitigate the impact of the proposals for the people of Lowton.”

Plans show a rolling stock depot at Slag Lane which would provide a jobs boost which has been welcomed by Wigan Council leader Lord Peter Smith.

Comments (4)

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12:07pm Thu 31 Jan 13

eggshell says...

This is what we have been battling in the South and Midlands.The amount of money being spent will make every job made ,once those lost and those spent abroad ,is astronomical and could be far better spent .
Please go to Stop HS2 .also write to your M.Ps and make them aware how you will be affected.Those obtaining compensation are only within a small area beside the track.if you are just outside you will have years of construction and then have to wait for it to be running a year before you can apply.One lady in her 90s wants to go into a home and has been told her house is worth nothing.
This is what we have been battling in the South and Midlands.The amount of money being spent will make every job made ,once those lost and those spent abroad ,is astronomical and could be far better spent . Please go to Stop HS2 .also write to your M.Ps and make them aware how you will be affected.Those obtaining compensation are only within a small area beside the track.if you are just outside you will have years of construction and then have to wait for it to be running a year before you can apply.One lady in her 90s wants to go into a home and has been told her house is worth nothing. eggshell
  • Score: 0

1:23pm Thu 31 Jan 13

padav says...

Let's be very clear here

Either we (collectively as the UK public) accept that new lines are required, to provide the necessary step change improvement in capacity, reliability, quality and speed or rail services, or we don't?

I accept that basic principle - but it seems certain parties want to move the goalposts according to how near any new line is to a particular locality.

New lines have to go somewhere so there will always be a few losers - but many winners. The compromise here is to choose a route that minimises any negative impacts and provide adequate compensation where mitigation is either inappropriate or physically impossible due to proximity.

No route exists to avoid everyone, everywhere!
Let's be very clear here Either we (collectively as the UK public) accept that new lines are required, to provide the necessary step change improvement in capacity, reliability, quality and speed or rail services, or we don't? I accept that basic principle - but it seems certain parties want to move the goalposts according to how near any new line is to a particular locality. New lines have to go somewhere so there will always be a few losers - but many winners. The compromise here is to choose a route that minimises any negative impacts and provide adequate compensation where mitigation is either inappropriate or physically impossible due to proximity. No route exists to avoid everyone, everywhere! padav
  • Score: 0

7:12pm Thu 31 Jan 13

kingsnewclothes says...

The battle has been going on in the Midlands and the Chilterns for more than 2 years but for some reason the government has only just announced the routes north of Lichfield. The experience up to now has been that anyone who objects is labelled a selfish ( despite the woeful compensation proposals - compensation consultation ends tonight ! ) NIMBY regardless of whether they live near the route or not.

Let's be clear. This is not a £ 34 Billion scheme it is a £ 39 Billion scheme. The government claims that this will create 100,000 jobs ( previously 1 million was the claim ) which would work out at £ 390,000 per job but bear in mind that a chunk of these are temporary and most of whatever else is created will be relocations -- for instance to a new business park in West London.

As for capacity , peak trains are currently only 52 % full out of Euston and there are plenty of options to increase capacity further more cheaply.

As for speed , a nice to have and nothing more. Journey times are already shorter than between comparable cities on the continent.
The battle has been going on in the Midlands and the Chilterns for more than 2 years but for some reason the government has only just announced the routes north of Lichfield. The experience up to now has been that anyone who objects is labelled a selfish ( despite the woeful compensation proposals - compensation consultation ends tonight ! ) NIMBY regardless of whether they live near the route or not. Let's be clear. This is not a £ 34 Billion scheme it is a £ 39 Billion scheme. The government claims that this will create 100,000 jobs ( previously 1 million was the claim ) which would work out at £ 390,000 per job but bear in mind that a chunk of these are temporary and most of whatever else is created will be relocations -- for instance to a new business park in West London. As for capacity , peak trains are currently only 52 % full out of Euston and there are plenty of options to increase capacity further more cheaply. As for speed , a nice to have and nothing more. Journey times are already shorter than between comparable cities on the continent. kingsnewclothes
  • Score: 0

6:38am Fri 1 Feb 13

shpvaluers says...

The preferred route is open for consultation and alongside the announcement, the government have opened an ‘Exceptional Hardship Scheme Consultation’ website.
The consultation closes on 29 April 2013.
This scheme is an early discretionary scheme which initially appears to be an early compensation package to negotiate the sale of property that is affected by HS2, for “those property owners that can demonstrate that they have an urgent need to sell”. This means those blighted by the HS2 proposal that would not be able to sell their property due to the scheme.

Clearly there is a valuation requirement and negotiation of compensation to include business and/or property loss, relocation costs, fees and other eligible costs and claim associated with the scheme. It is our service to maiximise the financial loss of an individual or business affected, whilst we recognise that this cannot compensate any property owner from the turmoil of such an announcement.

SHP VALUERS specialise in land & property compensation and at this stage we are meeting with affected property and business owners to consider their options, timescales etc.

We would be pleased to assist where possible and early responses to the consultation are essential.

adamp@shpvaluers.co.
uk
www.shpvaluers.co.uk
The preferred route is open for consultation and alongside the announcement, the government have opened an ‘Exceptional Hardship Scheme Consultation’ website. The consultation closes on 29 April 2013. This scheme is an early discretionary scheme which initially appears to be an early compensation package to negotiate the sale of property that is affected by HS2, for “those property owners that can demonstrate that they have an urgent need to sell”. This means those blighted by the HS2 proposal that would not be able to sell their property due to the scheme. Clearly there is a valuation requirement and negotiation of compensation to include business and/or property loss, relocation costs, fees and other eligible costs and claim associated with the scheme. It is our service to maiximise the financial loss of an individual or business affected, whilst we recognise that this cannot compensate any property owner from the turmoil of such an announcement. SHP VALUERS specialise in land & property compensation and at this stage we are meeting with affected property and business owners to consider their options, timescales etc. We would be pleased to assist where possible and early responses to the consultation are essential. adamp@shpvaluers.co. uk www.shpvaluers.co.uk shpvaluers
  • Score: 0

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